Welcome to the Fifty Lakes Property Owners Association (FLPOA)

Update: Enbridge Line 3 Pipeline Replacement Project – Posted November 9, 2017 – Submitted by Ken Neihart

Please click on the link below to view the timeline of events for key decisions, route permit information and certificate of need details. Final comments from the public are due on Wednesday, November 22nd, by 4:30pm.

Enbridge Line 3 Pipeline Final Comments Information


November Meeting Minutes – Posted November 9, 2017 – Submitted by Ken Neihart

Click on the link below to view the FLPOA meeting minutes from November 4, 2017.

View FLPOA Meeting Minutes – November 4, 2017


Join us for the Annual FLPOA Meeting August 12th – Posted August 8, 2017 – Submitted by Bob Stancer

The FLPOA Annual Meeting is scheduled for Saturday August 12, 2017 at 8:30 am. The meeting will be held at The Fifty Lakes Foundation Building. Beth Hippert from Crow Wing SWCD is the guest speaker, and she will focus on strategies that protect water quality, habitat, and stabilize shorelines. Social time is set from 8:30am to 9:00am, meeting from 9:00am to 10:00am, guest speaker from 10:00am to 11:00am, and we will adjourn by 11:30am. All are welcome!

View Meeting Agenda


Update: Enbridge Line 3 Pipeline Replacement Project – Posted August 8, 2017 – Submitted by Ken Neihart & Edited by Dianne Bell         

July 10, 2017, marked the close of the public comment period for residents of Minnesota to comment on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) regarding the proposed Enbridge Line 3 Pipeline replacement.   The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) and MN Department of Commerce will issue a final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on August 10, 2017. The PUC will conduct additional public hearings this fall (September – November), and the final decision on the two permits required for this project — consent permit and the route permit — is scheduled for April, 2018.

Background: Enbridge is seeking to replace its aging Line 3 pipeline, which was built in the 1960s, to transport heavy Canadian crude in a new 36 inch pipeline from the oil sands region of Alberta to refineries in the U.S. It crosses about a 340-mile swath of northern Minnesota from near the northwest corner of the state to its pipeline hub in Superior, Wisconsin. Line 3 is part of the company’s larger pipeline system that carries nearly 3 million gallons of oil a day from Canada, across northern Minnesota.

Why You Should Care: Proposed Pipeline Route – One of the key issues for Fifty Lakes residents is the preferred route that Enbridge wants. FLPOA objects to Enbridge’s preferred route because it deviates from the existing one and runs through a water-rich environment that would directly impact all Fifty Lakes property owners.

Local Response: Both Fifty Lakes Property Owners Association (FLPOA) and Whitefish Owners Property Association (WAPOA) have publicly come out against the proposed Enbridge Line 3 Pipeline Replacement project as it stands, and have publicly commented to the Minnesota Department of Commerce regarding deficiencies in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement. (Read WAPOA’s letter to the Environmental Review Manager, MN Department of Commerce).

Of first and foremost concern is the proximity of the proposed new route to valuable water and wild rice resources. According to Tom Watson, Director, Land Use and Government Relations for WAPOA, 900,000 barrels per day of heavy Canadian crude oil passing through 30-35 miles of the northern part of the Pine River Watershed (that is us; all of us) by a company with a “documented history” of 1.6 spills per week over 11 years and 300 barrels spilled per week and 85% being exported; is that something we want in this area of northern Minnesota?

Enbridge’s preferred route would run from 4 to 6 miles north of Fifty Lakes. (see proposed map below:

Map08082017It would cross Daggett Brook, run through a water-rich environment and run in a utility corridor that contains high-tension power lines. An oil spill north of Fifty Lakes could threaten our lakes, streams and water table. Unfortunately, an oil leak or spill is a question of ‘when’, not ‘if’.

The Dangers of Oil and Gas Pipelines: Oil pipelines are inherently susceptible to leaks and spills. Here’s a compelling video compiling recent analysis and data on oil and gas pipeline safety in the United States, showing a troubled history of spills, contamination, injuries and death. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rxqUXqPzog

Jobs?: The argument of new construction jobs generated by this pipeline falls flat when compared to the consequences. A few temporary construction jobs would be gained (which, by the way, would go primarily to contractors from Oklahoma and Arkansas, not locals!), however, at the expense of potential environmental devastation from oils leaks and spills that would impact us for decades. Compare this to the $700 million annually provided by travel and tourism in 4 Counties (Aitkin, Cass, Crow Wing and Hubbard Counties) which is threatened by this proposed pipeline.

As a commenter to Friends of the Headwaters mentioned, “In lake country, a barrel of water is worth more than a barrel of oil”. (See the Friends of the Headwaters website for some good information on the proposed Enbridge Line 3 Pipeline Replacement project: http://www.friendsoftheheadwaters.org/index.html)

Comments to the Public Utilities Commission and Department of Commerce: There have been many comments to the PUC regarding the DEIS. Most of the responses have been against the preferred route and cite many shortcomings and items that are missing from the DEIS.

– Additional Objections: In addition to the new proposed route, there are four objections to this proposed pipeline outlined in a signed letter by over thirty members of the joint Minnesota House of Representatives and Minnesota State Senate, who have requested that the Minnesota Department of Commerce significantly revise the DEIS: (for the comprehensive letter to the Minnesota PUC click here https://www.edockets.state.mn.us/EFiling/edockets/searchDocuments.do?method=showPoup&documentId={70FF7F5D-0000-C71C-9816-9FA4327B1D13}&documentTitle=20177-134250-01)

  • Failure to appropriately quantify oil spill exposure
  • Tribal considerations and Line 3 abandonment
  • Stronger consideration of climate impacts
  • A more comprehensive analysis of a no-build alternative

Additional Concerns: Because Line 3 is old, it requires increasingly extensive maintenance. It’s become corroded and cracked in places, requiring 950 excavations in the past ten years. Since 1990, there have been 15 failures of Line 3 that each released more than 50 barrels of oil, according to the DEIS.

– No “Abandonment Plan” for Pipeline Removal and Disposal: In addition, there is no plan for eradication or removal of the old pipeline once the new one is installed.   There are no state rules addressing abandonment.   The group Minnesotans for Pipeline Cleanup (http://www.pipelinecleanupmn.org) challenge Enbridge for having no “abandonment plan” for the old and decaying pipeline, other than leaving it in the ground to deteriorate and contaminate the water as it decays. Property owners would not be compensated for damage to their property or water.

– Indigenous Community Concerns: Critics say potential spills would threaten a region rich in lakes, rivers and wild rice waters. The environmental study also notes that it crosses a disputed section of the White Earth Indian reservation, as well as ceded territory that tribal members value for wild rice, hunting and fishing.

In fact, the DEIS fails to appropriately quantify oil spill exposure.

Failure to analyze alternate paths: The report analyzed four alternate paths for the pipeline to take across northern Minnesota to end in Superior. One of those routes loops south of Mille Lacs Lake. Another would be moved north of the current corridor, while two options would keep the new pipeline in roughly the same path as the old one.

The draft environmental review weighs the costs and benefits of several different alternatives to Enbridge’s proposed project, including using the existing Line 3, transporting oil by train or truck, or creating an entirely new pipeline route that bypasses northern Minnesota and instead flows south to Illinois.

The options all offer different costs and benefits. Trucks and trains are more likely to have smaller spills. Pipelines are less likely to have spills in the first place, but when they occur, they tend to be much larger.

Summary: The threat of oils spills and permanent contamination to our pristine and sensitive waterways and ecosystem in the Pine River Watershed is very real with the proposed Enbridge Pipeline 3 Replacement Project. The Fifty Lakes Property Owners Association (FLPOA) and the Whitefish Property Owners Association (WAPOA) have grave concerns about Enbridge’s current proposal as it stands. The potential devastation to our lakes and waterways that threatens the second-largest travel and tourism economy in Minnesota is not acceptable. We urge all FLPOA and WAPOA members to stay informed on this very important topic and to make your voices heard.


A DNR Conversation about Fifty Lakes Fisheries – Posted August 8, 2017 – Written By Mike Prouty

“You have some beautiful lakes in Fifty Lakes,” said Mike Knapp, Assistant Director of Fisheries at the MN DNR Brainerd office.

Sometimes no news is good news. An interview with Knapp was remarkable for it’s lack of any crises or red flags regarding the fish resources in Fifty Lakes. “Remember, my focus in on fish,” said Knapp. I’m not qualified to discuss aquatic invasive plants or animals.”

According to Knapp, our lakes are collectively known for abundant populations of panfish, walleye, and northern pike. “Even the rough fish in your lakes, such as dogfish and suckers, play a role in the health of lakes,” said Knapp. While the public and resource managers are rightfully concerned about aquatic invasive plants and organisms, we don’t have invasive fish species such as Asian Carp, to worry about in Fifty Lakes.

On average, the DNR assesses fish populations in Minnesota lakes every 6 to 8 years. To measure a lake’s fish population, the DNR uses either electro-shocking or fish traps (nets or baskets). This survey information that is collected in the summer, is then analyzed the following winter. By the following spring, this survey information can be found on the “Lakefinder: MN DNR” website. Once the long-term trend of a lake’s fish population is known by several rounds of survey data, the DNR has several management options. The DNR may initiate management activities such as changing bag limits or instituting fish stocking programs.

Knapp pointed out that because of the number of lakes in our area, fishing pressure is dispersed and so fish populations in any one lake are not adversely affected by fishing. “I think knowledgeable anglers can still catch nice sized walleye and panfish in the Fifty Lakes area,” said Mike. Mike pointed out that some fish populations, like crappie are very cyclical. As different age classes of fish mature, can rise and fall.

When asked what one thing lake owners could do to protect and improve fish populations in Fifty Lakes, he identified the need to protect and maintain lakeshore aquatic vegetation. For example, keeping our shorelines in natural vegetation with rushes and down logs is a god thing. In addition, try to avoid putting in lawns that extend down to the water’s edge. Mike acknowledged that many people, including himself, like to have swim beaches for their families, and he recognizes this is a legitimate use of lakes. But, he cautioned that, collectively, cabin owners need to be careful not to change the nature of the lake habitat.

Taken individually, the activity of one cabin owner won’t have much affect on a lake, but collectively all cabin owners can affect the ability of a lake to support healthy fish populations. “People who live along a lake have an incredible impact on fish habitat,” said Mike. He pointed out that cabin owners need to be aware of state regulations that govern shoreline manipulation. These regulations can be found on the MN DNR website. To see a list of lakeside regulations, click on the following link. http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rlp/index.html


Stories from the Northwoods: The Fish House  – Posted August 8, 2017 – Written by Bill Leadens          

A Storm was coming….

He had been fishing for some time now…..inside his fish house. It was the coldest season of the year.

Winter in the year 1925.

It was late afternoon under a cold and darkening grey Minnesota sky. With his ice spud, it had taken him 5 minutes to chop the hole precisely locating it on the lake. After he had chopped the hole, he pulled the little house over that hole and lined it up with the hole already cut into the floor of his fish house. He knew this fishing spot by drawing an imaginary line with his eye from the eagles nest in the large white pine on the north side of the lake to the dead birch hanging over the lake on the southeast side. This was his base line. Then, in deep snow, he walked 330 steps from the south most lake edge following this line to the point at which he now sat staring at a small floating cork bobber. If little snow, but good traction on the ice, he stepped off 306 steps. All ending up in the same spot. He knew the counts because he had to drag the old fish house every foot. He did this twice every winter, once to set out the fish house and once back to shore before ice out, not counting his many treks to actually fish.

Putting up with that labor was essential. A Minnesota winter has killed more than one unprotected person while fishing on large AND small lakes. Add darkness, winds out of a nightmare and never ending curtains of horizontal snow, the equation is set for a fisherman to get lost, freeze to death or fall through the ice – not necessarily in that order. The walk to and from the fish house, once set, was something he never took for granted.

If a fish house was positioned from the start of the season, just right and over good structure below, it would stay there all winter. He never had to move his twice once set. He always caught fish right where he was and he would smile with that thought.

It was January. The baby would be born in a few months. He wondered if it would be a boy or a girl. It made no difference to him but there is a lot of work to do on the farm so either would eventually do what is required. All the same, he had a boys name in mind if it was a boy and he knew she had in mind a girls name if it was a girl.

The cork bobber never really sat motionless even though there hadn’t been a single wave since freeze up. This time of year the small variations of moving ice from the continual thickening and growing of the lakes’ ice caused the water level in the open hole to rise and fall as if the lake under him was alive and breathing.

Sometimes a fisherman can see far into the future and sometimes he can’t just by watching the bobber. Sometimes for an ice fisherman the bobber isn’t just something connected to a string which in turn is connected to a hook lost in the depths of a lake. To him it I was actually a window into a moment of time he is free to wonder in. Thats where he was right now. A traveler on a knifes’ edge of time.

To be sure, he was quite aware of the wind building outside the fish house walls. He was comforted by the fact he had built it from the ground up with the emphasis on weight reduction. From the sawmill, he ordered air dried pine 2 by 2’s and spaced them 2 feet on center between the top plate and bottom plate, also of 2 x 2’s, to create the walls of a 4 foot by 6 foot rectangle. Small wood gusset brackets strengthened the frame. The roof was a “slant roof.” 7 feet high on one side slanting to 6 foot 3 inches the entire long length on the opposite side. Plywood was expensive and it wouldn’t be until 1928 the industry would standardize into 4 foot by 8 foot sheets. He bought two sheets from the sawmill. One sheet came out to be 5’ by 5’ which he cut just right for the floor so he had no waste and nothing left over. The other sheet was 4’X6’ which the sawmill only had one of and would work perfectly for the roof. He had used smaller lengths of flat and round pieces of steel from an abandoned rail road freight car to fashion the fish house base with skids he bolted to the plywood floor. Black heavy tar paper covered the entire exterior. Thin cut slab wood given free to him by the sawmill for buying the plywood, was nailed on for the walls in a standard ship-lap form. He made a narrow “in swinging door” and installed two small windows – material all from the rail road car, sealing up the fish house.

The fish start biting in January at about 4 pm on this Minnesota lake…. about the time it starts getting dark. He had two old coal oil lanterns with new wicks. One lantern actually did a pretty good job of lighting up the fish house and also giving him a little warmth, at least enough so he could take his gloves off when necessary. Only when it was extremely cold, like tonight, did he light the second lantern…. coal oil, also known as kerosene, after all, was not free.

Scattered within the “breaths” of the lake, loud sharp cracking sounds shot across the surface. He could hear a start of a new crack begin far off in the distance with a crescendoing “rip” as it passed closely by the fish house, sometimes right under his feet. The water in the hole could rise as much 2 inches as the Ice settled down to its new expanded condition. He studied the bobber after being momentarily startled by the last fracturing explosion of the ice below. The bobber stabilized.

He was glad he and his wife lived far away from Minneapolis. His best friend died 6 months ago of smallpox there. They had ice fished together many times over the years on this very spot and in this very fish house. Hard times for his friend before the smallpox took him. He had been trying to get a job at the flour mill in Minneapolis and had moved into a nearby cheap boarding house sharing everything with “who knows how many.” The papers where saying many more are dying all around Minnesota but most of the deaths were in Minneapolis for some reason. Yes, sometimes a fisherman can see into the future and sometimes he can’t. In this case, he couldn’t and that before the new baby was a year old 500 Minnesotans would die from the this thing called smallpox.

“Wow, that was some gust!” He said aloud. His attention was drawn away from the bobber to outside. Through the window facing east, he could see it was snowing hard. As the last light of the day was fading the snow fell sideways from left to right carried on the northwest wind.

37 years earlier, he, himself, was just a baby and blissfully unaware of what was going on outside of his window then. His parents had settled near a small town west of Brainerd. It was there his family experienced his first Storm.

He knew his parents called it the “Children’s Blizzard.” Others called it the “Great Blizzard.” In 1888 hundreds of people died in the storm as it traveled out of Colorado and through Minnesota. Many more died from the resulting amputations from frostbite and infection complications afterwards. It was in January back then that most of the deaths came from children trying to get home from school.

History would report that in the late 1800’s, North America was experiencing a “little Ice age.” The entire earth cooled as a result of the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in Indonesia. Still effecting the climate years later in December of 1887, 40 inches of snow had fallen in Minnesota. Then, in early January, a disastrous ice storm hit. A week after the ice storm of January 5, 1888, the weather warmed to a couple of beautiful sunny days. It was a Thursday, January 12, 1888, he played in a crib as a baby instead of walking to school as a student on an “unusually warm and sunny day.” However, many children did walk to school that day, for the last time.

It was a good idea to have a second lantern in the fish house. He had often heard and was always reminded during any given project or event, the old adage was right, “if you only have one of something, it is not enough.” In this case, the extra light and warmth added to the feeling of security as he jiggled his line and bobber which in turn twitched the hook and worm 30 feet below. He had lots of worms that he had transferred from the compost pile at the edge of the garden to the warmth of the cellar earlier in the fall. Crappies were his favorite and it would be easy to filet out the bones for the new baby.

From outside the fish house, a passerby would see a yellow glow of light through both frost covered windows. Except, that light had only one witness tonight and he was huddled inside a fish house over a bobber. He was holding a two foot long pole, alone, on the middle of a remote Minnesota lake, under a now jet black night.

“Time never really stands still,” he guessed. “But it comes close sometimes while ice fishing,” he thought. He wondered if he could actually MAKE time stop here, now, with no one watching. Whats to stop him from making one small impossible miracle? Nothing. He laughed a hesitating exhaling smile as he reconsidered the possibility. It occurred to him that STOPPING time was more likely then going BACK in time. Going BACK in time has to be impossible because once the crappie is hooked, well, its hooked. But, the FUTURE…. thats different. The Future is just a “Breath away” from NOW. Which seems pretty darn close by to “RIGHT NOW.” That is probably why he liked Ice fishing because he was so close to seeing into the future. “I am working on it,” he thought.

The crappie is the second most valued fish in any Minnesota lake, he figured. For eating, only perhaps the walleye is valued more or equally. “The crappie can bite so lightly,” he thought. He could only compare it to a wisp of wind passing by a tree trunk…unnoticed. However, a good ice fisherman knows how to balance the right bobber on the right line set up for the best telltale signal the crappie is interested far below in the blackness of the water. Certainly there are times the bobber disappears in a second and a slight hook set with steady line retrieval puts “one in the bucket.” But there are times, he knew, more than not, that the infamous ‘Paper Mouths” already have the hook in their mouths without even the slightest indication at the bobber! Sometimes he saw the bobber actually “rise” turning the bobber on its side in a sort of slow motion experiment in impossible engineering.

He didn’t know there was already a 3 foot snow drift outside his door. But it would make no difference. Years of experience with ice fishing taught him to always face the door of his fish house towards the closest shoreline and never fish in an “out swinging” door fish house. “Both lessons could save your life,” he would say. With the door facing the direction OFF the ice it would give a person a referenced starting point in dark or bad weather. The “in swing” door ensured you would never get trapped inside from a variety of exterior calamities ….. like the snow drift building just outside and in front of the door. “An inadvertently knocked over lantern inside a fish house can be an instant death sentence if you can’t escape quickly,” he knew.

He had a pocket watch but never carried it onto the ice. It was a gift from his father many years ago before he died. He didn’t want to loose it in the snow or drop it through a hole. Then again, he never felt he needed to know the exact time while fishing because going home would not happen until he had at least a half a dozen fish. “One thing had not much to do with the other,” he often said.

The wind was so strong now, he realized that if he hadn’t piled snow up all round the base of the fish house when he first set it out, he and the house would be flying across the ice sheet instead of locked tightly where it now stood.

Sometimes an ice fisherman can see into the future and sometimes he can’t. He figured it might be the same for women, but he was a man and couldn’t be sure about what a women can see. A man sees what other men see. He would leave it up to a women to think about the other. The point is he wasn’t perfect at looking into the future. “Things would be different” he thought to himself, “if he had more time to watch the bobber.” If he was better at concentrating on the bobber, he would have warned his neighbor in 15 years not to go duck hunting on that warm November day in 1940. It would be known at the Armistice Day Blizzard. His neighbor would be one of 49 Minnesotans to die on a day when temperatures would go from the middle 60’s in the afternoon to 9 degree’s that night. 50 mile per hour winds and 27 inches of snow would trap his neighbor after his duck boat sank in 5 foot waves. He would die on a small spit of land in the middle of the Mississippi. No witness lived to repeat his neighbors last words.

The fish house was now responding to the ever increasing tempest of wind and snow doing its best to awake a traveler. “It must be 8 o’clock,” he finally said aloud. He counted 9 large crappies in the bucket. He had a vague memory of each one caught. He would be bringing home dinner for two nights and maybe a little left over for a lunch time fish sandwich for the baby via mom. It was time to leave the safety of the time capsule known also as the fish house.

It was time to go home.

He stood and blew out the second lantern. That one would stay in the fish house. He rolled up his line. He repositioned his beaver fur hat on his head and tied the earflaps tight down over his ears and under his chin. The doors’ long wooden handle accommodated nicely his thick fur lined deer skin mittens he was now putting on. He stuck his right arm through the handle of the metal bucket of crappies until the wire handle rested on his forearm and lifted the prize while grabbing the old lighted lantern at the same time with the same right hand. He opened the door to the Storm with his left hand. Saying nothing, he stepped out and through the snowbank while closing the door. Walking straight ahead and into the blackness, he started to count each step.

Inside the now empty and dark old fish house and in front of a hole in its floor, sat a single common milking stool. On it, positioned just right, rested a simple cork bobber.

A Storm was coming.

  1. Wikipedia-History of Plywood.
  2. MNopedia-Smallpox epidemic of 1924–25 by Paul Nelson
  3. Wikipedia-The Great Blizzard of 1888
  4. Wikipedia-1940 Armistice Day Blizzard

Purple Loosestrife on Mitchell Lake – Posted on August 8, 2017 – Written by Ken Neihart
It is about that time of the year for purple loosestrife to bloom. This is the time to remove the flower and capture the seeds before they fall to the ground. Last year some Mitchell Lake property owners did just that! Seeds have been known to remain viable in the soil for many years.

Flower removal/seed collection is the first management tool for purple loosestrife and is the most environmentally safe method. If this method doesn’t work some additional methods are available. The use of herbicides, beetles or a combination of all these option would be the next step.

Our goal is to remove purple loosestrife from Mitchell Lake. It probably will take a few years, and we may have to use some different removal methods, but purple loosestrife can be controlled.

Please email me to volunteer for this important project. (Ken Neihart – kjneihart@aol.com)  Or, stop by for a visit when the FLPOA holds it’s annual meeting on Saturday, August 12, 2017 at 8:30am at the Fifty Lakes Foundation Building. I will have a map of Mitchell to locate where purple loosestrife is located on the lake.


Update and Comment Period for the Enbridge Line 3 Project  – Posted July 1, 2017 – Submitted  & Written by Ken Neihart &  Janet Hill
If approved, the Line 3 project is slated to come through Aitkin County. Please click here to learn about the latest developments.

The Minnesota Dept. of Commerce (DOC) is legally obligated to respond to every comment submitted by Monday, July 10th. The more substantive questions we submit, the better. 
Click here to learn how the best way to mail, email or FAX your comments.


June FLPOA Board Meeting Mimutes  – Posted July 1, 2017

Click here to review the June 24th Meeting Minutes.


Bell Family Gift at Fifty Lakes Day – Posted July 1, 2017 – Submitted by Dianne Bell

Reverend Karl Bell

Reverend Karl E. Bell

Long-time Mitchell Lake resident and FLPOA member, Reverend Karl E. Bell, passed away on April 27th after a long battle with pulmonary fibrosis. On June 24th, at Fifty Lakes Day, the Bell family was pleased to present the FLPOA with a donation in Karl’s memory totaling $1,000, designated for improving the water quality of Mitchell Lake, where he lived.

The Bell family has a long legacy in Fifty Lakes, having been on Mitchell Lake for over 70 years. After spending many summers at Christian’s Resort on Mitchell Lake in the 1930’s and 1940’s, Karl’s parents, Dr. Clifford & Louise Bell, purchased lakeshore property on the eastern shore of Mitchell Lake in October, 1945.

Karl was an Episcopal priest for over fifty years, serving parishes in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Florida, Venezuela and Germany, which meant that the family frequently moved. But throughout all the global moves, the family cabin was “home” and a constant fixture for Karl and his family.

Upon retirement from the active ministry in 2003, Karl moved back to Fifty Lakes, and the family ‘cabin’ became his permanent home.  He made many improvements to it over the years and truly loved being ‘at the lake’, listening to the loons call, enjoying sunsets from the deck, and visiting with neighbors in the Fifty Lakes community.

An active FLPOA member, Karl closely followed developments pertaining to Mitchell Lake and the surrounding Fifty Lakes area.  For several years before his death, he became more and more concerned about the declining lake water quality, particularly that of his own, Mitchell Lake.

The property has now passed down to the third generation of the Bell family, Karl’s children, Dianne and Andrew Bell, and their families. Like their grandparents and father before them, they are committed to continuing their family’s legacy of being good stewards of the land and water.

To that end, upon Karl’s death they decided that it would be a fitting tribute to direct memorial donations to the Fifty Lakes Property Owners Association, with the specific aim of contributing towards improving the water quality of Mitchell Lake.

Preliminary discussions have already begun with an environmental consulting group specializing in a variety of water management issues, including water quality assessments and lake & watershed management plans.

Because $1,000 is already earmarked from Karl Bell’s memorial toward improving Mitchell Lake’s water quality, FLPOA would like to engage an environmental consultant to begin the process of improving Mitchell Lake’s water quality. We look forward to beginning this initiative yet this summer.

If you are a property owner on Mitchell Lake, please consider donating towards this initiative. Mitchell Lake’s water quality has declined in the past few years, and efforts are underway to help reverse this. Please remember that donations are tax deductible and can be made on-line here.


FLPOA Annual Meeting Right Around the Corner – Posted July 1, 2017 – Submitted by Bob Stancer
The FLPOA Annual Meeting is scheduled for Saturday August 12, 2017 at 8:30 am. The meeting will be held at The Fifty Lakes Foundation Building. Beth Hippert from Crow Wing SWCD is the guest speaker, and she will focus on strategies that protect water quality, habitat, and stabilize shorelines. Social time is set from 8:30am to 9:00am, meeting from 9:00am to 10:00am, guest speaker from 10:00am to 11:00am, and we will adjourn by 11:30am. All are welcome!


Dues Renewed! – Posted June 22, 2017
In May, FLPOA members and all property owners in Fifty Lakes received a mailing from FLPOA that included AIS and membership information. We are excited to share that nearly 100 folks renewed their dues or joined FLPOA! We are so grateful for your support.

The 2017 membership year started June 12017 and will end May 31, 2018. With this in mind, we ask that you check and see if your membership is current. All FLPOA donations and membership dues are only $20, are tax deductible, and they help the organization continue to administer the programs that protect our precious land and lakes. Please donate, renew your membership or become a FLPOA member by clicking here. (If you pay using PayPal please consider paying $21 to cover the PayPal transaction cost of $.80.) 


FLPOA at Fifty Lakes Day Celebration – Posted May 22, 2017

Join us on Saturday, June 24th, beginning at 10am, in the Fifty Lakes Bar parking lot/pavilion for the the Fifty Lakes Day Celebration. FLPOA will have a booth to share the latest updates about the Enbridge pipeline, water quality and AIS. The association will also host a “Musical Petting Zoo” booth. Stop by and play a musical instrument you’ve always wanted to try! All proceeds from the Musical Petting Zoo booth will be donated to FLPOA.


FLPOA Donations & Member Dues for 2017 – Posted May 22, 2017
In May, FLPOA members and all property owners in Fifty Lakes will receive a mailing that includes AIS and membership information. The 2017 membership year starts June 1, 2017 and will end May 31, 2018. Please check to see if your membership is current. All FLPOA donations and membership dues are only $20, are tax deductible, and they help the organization continue to administer the programs that protect our precious land and lakes. Please donate, renew your membership or become a FLPOA member by clicking here. (If you pay using PayPal please consider paying $21 to cover the PayPal transaction cost of $.80.) 


Meeting Reminders – Posted May 22, 2017
The next FLPOA meeting is set for Saturday, June 24th, after booth set-up at the Fifty Lakes Day booth.

The FLPOA Annual Meeting is scheduled for Saturday August 12, 2017 at 8:30 am. The meeting will be held at The Fifty Lakes Foundation Building.


Enbridge Pipeline Update – Posted May 22, 2017
Submitted by Ken Neihart and Written by Melodee Monicken of Friends of the Headwaters

In 2014, with your support, Friends of the Headwaters took the contention that an Environmental Impact Statement was necessary for oil pipelines to the MN Court of Appeals.  In 2015, the court ruled unanimously in our favor. Then in 2016, Enbridge cited the EIS’ regulatory delays as an explanation for placing the Sandpiper pipeline on “indefinite” hiatus.

It’s been a long haul, but nothing is over; we’re still trying to keep Enbridge’s relocated Line 3 pipeline away from the Mississippi Headwaters and Minnesota’s iconic lake country. During the last year, we’ve been working to ensure that Line3’s hard-won EIS is honest, rigorous, and comprehensive.  And today—finally–the Department of Commerce released their draft EIS, the first Environmental Impact Statement ever done on an oil pipeline in Minnesota.https://mn.gov/commerce/energyfacilities/resource.html?Id=34695

Friends of the Headwaters anticipates a busy spring as the draft is thousands of pages and a couple feet high. We’re already working on our commentary, examining the draft for omissions, gaps, and the sort of unwarranted conclusions reported in today’s Star Tribune Newspaper (May 15, 2017). We want to see competent and independent analyses from credentialed, experienced scientists. Learn more about Enbridge Pipeline Plans here: http://www.friendsoftheheadwaters.org/index.html

Three Requests for Your Help

1. Please Note the DOC’s June Meeting Dates on Your Crowded Summer Calendar:
The DOC’s public information meetings will take place between June 6 and June 22. Written comments can be submitted until July 10, 2017. (More specifics below.) Friends of the Headwaters is a small, all-volunteer group. We don’t have salaried organizers; we rely on YOU. It’s important that you show up, that you comment on the EIS and share your concerns about Enbridge’s expanded Line 3, a pipeline that would carry 760,000 gallons of the dirtiest fuel on the planet.  Every day. Through prime Minnesota water resources.

2. Please Prepare Substantive Commentary:
If you want some help developing your arguments or gathering evidence for your commentary on Line 3, please let us know.  We can provide some guidance during our June commentary prep sessions. (Dates/venues to be announced.)  What we find in this draft and how we comment will make a difference.  “Substantive commentary” should be addressed/answered in the final EIS.

3. Please Write to the Governor, Legislators, and the Commissioners of the MPCA and DNR:
Please support the governor’s veto of the Energy Omnibus Bill.  This bill (SF1937) would permit pipelines to bypass the Certificate of Need.  It would allow the pipeline approval process to ignore the standards of the EIS and avoid investigation of alternate routes. IF (big if) Enbridge can demonstrate a real need for a relocated Line 3, the company should demonstrate why the applicant’s preferred route is superior to other options.

• Please let the governor know that you support his veto of any bill that would eliminate the Certificate of Need for oil pipelines. Let him know that you have his back, that you want a rigorous EIS to examine Line 3, that it’s imperative to investigate other viable routes—especially if he hopes to have a legacy of clean water.
Governor Dayton
Telephone: 651-201-3400
Toll Free: 800-657-3717  https://mn.gov/governor/contact-us/form/

• Please call and/or e-mail your state representatives and state senators. Tell them that you want a certificate of need for pipelines, that you care about clean water, that you expect them to protect Minnesota’s wetlands, surface water, and groundwater from oil, diluted bitumen, and “drilling fluids.”http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/members/hmem.asp

• Please contact the commissioners of Minnesota’s lead environmental agencies. Ask them to protect our water and defend an independent and competent EIS on Line 3. Ask them to provide strong support for Governor Dayton’s veto of any bill that threatens environmental protections. Please ask them to support the certificate of need as an essential part of any oil pipeline application for PUC approval.
John Linc Stine
Commissioner Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
520 Lafayette Rd, St Paul, MN 55155
(800) 657-3864
Phone: 651-757-2014
Fax: 651-296-6334
John.Stine@state.mn.us

Tom Landwehr
Commissioner MN Department of Natural Resources
DNR Central Office
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4040
(651) 296-6157
(888) 646-6367 commissioner.dnr@state.mn.us

Comment Period: Written comments will be accepted through Monday, July 10, 2017. Comments may be emailed, mailed, or faxed:

  •  Email address: Pipeline.Comments@state.mn.us
  • U.S. Mail: Jamie MacAlister, Environmental Review Manager Minnesota Department of Commerce 85 7th Place East, Suite 500 St. Paul, MN 55101-2198
  • Fax: 651-539-0109

Important: Please include the docket numbers CN-14-916 and PPL-15-137 on all comments. Comments will be made available to the public via the MPUC’s electronic docketing system (eDockets) and the Department of Commerce’s website, except in limited circumstances consistent with the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act. Personally identifying information is not edited or deleted from submissions.

Public Information Meetings
Each public information meeting will provide an opportunity to learn about the information contained in the EIS and provide oral or written comments into record. A court reporter will record all oral comments; comment forms will be available for persons who wish to provide written comments. Each meeting will provide the same opportunity to obtain information and the opportunity to comment. Dates and locations for Department of Commerce Commentary on Line 3 Draft EIS:

Tuesday
 June 6, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Rice Lake Community Center
13830 Community Loop
Bagley, MN 56621

Tuesday
 June 6, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
IRA Civic Center
1401 NW 3rd Ave
Grand Rapids, MN 55744

Wednesday
 June 7, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Park Rapids High School Cafetorium
401 Huntsinger Ave
Park Rapids, MN 56470

Wednesday
 June 7, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Palace Casino Hotel
16599 69th Ave NW
Cass Lake, MN 56633

Thursday
 June 8, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Downtown Fair Building
107 W 7th Ave
Floodwood, MN 55736

Thursday
 June 8, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Central Lakes College Classroom
E54,
501 West College Drive
Brainerd, MN 56401

Friday June 9, 2017
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Maslowski Wellness & Research Center
17 5th Street Southwest
Wadena, MN 56482

Monday
 June 12, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Grand Casino Hinckley
777 Lady Luck Drive
Hinckley, MN 55037

Monday
 June 12, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
East Lake Community Center
36666 State Hwy 65
McGregor, MN 56718

Tuesday 
June 13, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Fond du Lac Community College
2101 14th Street
Cloquet, MN 55720

Tuesday 
June 13, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Intercontinental Hotel Saint Paul
11 E. Kellogg Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55101

Wednesday
 June 14, 2017
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Staples Community Center
122 6th Street NE
Staples, MN 56479

Wednesday
 June 14, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Initiative Foundation
405 1st Street Southeast
Little Falls, MN 56345

Thursday
 June 15, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Henry’s Catering and Banquet Hall
6774 MN-25
Foley, MN 56329

Thursday 
June 15, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Phoenix Hotel & Banquet Center
210 MN-23
Milaca, MN 56353

Friday 
June 16, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
The Grand Event Center
2025 Rowland Rd
Mora, MN 55051

Tuesday 
June 20, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Marshall County Central Schools
310 West Minnesota Avenue
Newfolden, MN 56738

Tuesday 
June 20, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Hallock City Hall
163 3rd Street SE
Hallock, MN 56728

Wednesday
 June 21, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Ralph Engelstad Arena, Imperial Room
525 Brooks Avenue
North
Thief River Falls, MN 56701

Wednesday 
June 21, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Plummer Senior Citizen Center
185 Minnesota Street
Plummer, MN 56748

Thursday
 June 22, 2017
10:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Gully Community Center
120 Main Street
Gully, MN 56646

Thursday
 June 22, 2017
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Sanford Center and
George W. Nielson Convention Center
1111 Event Center Drive NE
Bemidji, MN 56601


Join Us for the April 8th FLPOA Board Meeting – Posted April 1, 2017
The next FLPOA board meeting will be held on Saturday, April 8th at 8:30am. We’ll meet at the Fifty Lakes Community Room in the Fire Station, and everyone is welcome to attend.  We hope to see you there! View Meeting Agenda..

Additionally, if you have any questions, comments, or would like to volunteer to help with the FLPOA, please drop us an email any time. Email the folks at the FLPOA.


WAPOA Offers Discounted Trees to Property Owners – Posted April 1, 2017 Submitted by Ken Neihart

Plant a tree and protect the lakes!  You can purchase 12” – 18” inch seedlings, consisting of Red Pine, Birch, White Pine, Jack Pine, Red Maple, High Bush Cranberry, Black Chokeberry and Serviceberry for only 25 cents each through WAPOA’s second annual tree sale.  WAPOA (Whitefish Area Property Owners Association) is providing trees again at a significant discount in an effort to protect water quality on the Whitefish Chain of Lakes.

We are able to provide the trees at a discounted rate to property owners through WAPOA subsidies and a state of MN cost sharing opportunity.  It is well documented that lands with good tree cover protect the lakes by slowing down run-off, allowing the water to soak into the ground and reduce lake pollution from chemicals such as roadway salt and oils.  Trees and shrubs also slow down run-off containing soil, plant materials, fertilizers, and pesticides.

The discounted trees are available in limited quantities, 50 per property owner.  The only restriction is that the trees are to be planted on lands surrounding or draining into the Whitefish Chain.   You can also purchase tree protection cages prices at $12.50 per package of 25 cages.  This year we will also have seed mixes of native flowers and grasses for shore land plantings.

Tree orders can be placed now through April 21, 2017 (or while supplies last) by contacting Jeff Laurel at email address jlaurel@tds.net, or by phone at (952) 217-9429. To order or discuss seed mixes appropriate for your situation, contact Brian Olson at email address brian@terraincorp.net or call (612) 309-1784.

Pick-up trees and seeds at Ideal Town Hall on Friday, May 12th, 1pm – 4 pm or at the Crosslake Community Center on Saturday, May 13th, 9am – 1pm.  It is recommended that the trees be planted within a few days of pick-up, for best growing success.


Stories from the North Woods: The Drive Up North – Posted April 1, 2017 By Bill Leadens

At night, if you lay just right in the back seat of the old station wagon you can see the stars. Thats what he was looking at now. To the blond haired seven year old the stars held a wonderment unmatched in his mind. He was eating a tunafish sandwich with olives as the family motored northbound under a magical dome of shimmering light. It was Friday and like many other Fridays he was eating his mothers pre-made sandwiches of tuna fish earmarked for the drive up north. Till his dying day, he would always love tunafish sandwiches with green olives.

His brothers were somewhere in the car too, but, as long as they didn’t touch him on any part of his body he was fine. Besides, he was happy because after a week of school, he was heading “up north.”

He studied the randomness of the stars from the darkness of the wagon. His thoughts turned to the school playground from earlier in the week. He remembered his first kiss better than who it was that gave it to him. During recess she had chased him all the way to the old growth tree line boarding the playground in the then very rural suburb of Minneapolis. She had caught up to him and pinned him up against a large red oak tree. One of her arms locked straight out with her palm tight against the thick bark on his right side and her other arm the same on his left side. While face to face, she said, “ You can’t say my name right.” With that, she leaned forward and kissed him on his lips and then she ran away. He had “wet kisses” before from family that sometimes made him shiver so he would quickly wipe his mouth after greetings and goodbyes. But, from what ever her name was, for some reason he would never forget this kiss against the old tree. It did bother him a little bit, though, he couldn’t pronounce her name right, “what ever it was.” Of course he still wiped his mouth off afterwards on his sleeve.

“No way” could he find the cabin on his own but he did know “about” where It was. “ Under the North Star,” he knew. He was old enough to point it out to any that asked. He couldn’t see the North Star from where he was laying in the back seat but knew if he was driving the car he could find it in no time. The North Star never changed positions but the “Big Dipper” did, so, sometimes it took him a minute. Finding the Big Dipper was the secret to finding the North Star. He loved living in Minnesota even though he had never lived anywhere else and when he got older he would understand why Minnesota was the North Star State.

He could feel the bumps in the road as the family drove. Nothing severe enough to pay attention to nor was the rattling of cars interior enough to distract him from his thoughts. Going to “the lake” was an “adventure!” He never bothered to put it into words but if he thought about it long enough he would have taken a second before he would just say, “because, it is fun!” If pressed he would say something about the lush but “spooky forests” and dirt trails, the smells of so much life, candy from the nearby resort (pink Snaps tasted like soap), neighbors and nearby family always welcoming him, other kids to play and explore together with, and everywhere water to play and swim in.

What was really scary was being in the boat during the “white caps.” The green outboard that said, “Johnson” on the side, could go just fast enough so the water spray would get the people in the back of the boat soaking wet while bouncing on White Caps! He remembered another old silver motor called the “coffee Grinder.” That one took a rope that you had to carry separately and “wind around the top just right and then pull real hard.” Sometimes He saw that done many times before it would start. He figured he was strong enough to do it himself but was never asked so he couldn’t prove it.

He liked sitting in the front most seat of the old Lone Star boat because he could get a “wild ride,” stay dry and have the seat all to himself. It took skill to get in and out of the boat. “The floor of the boat isn’t flat!” “You just don’t jump in like you think or you will fall either inside the boat or worse yet fall outside and into the water.” “Who knows what, if that happened,” he thought. Especially if you were “far out in the middle of the lake.” “You would never touch bottom if you fell into the lake there,” he would say.

He would admit that sometimes he would fall asleep during the drive up north. “Anybody could,” he thought. “It’s a long way to the lake.” But, he was quick to add he always woke up when they “hit the gravel.” Before you get to the cabin, you have to go down a long gravel road. Somewhere he heard about “10 miles.” He didn’t mind that part of the drive but it sure did “make the car bounce and rattle and dust came into the car too!” Eventually he came to the “really scary” part of the trip. Going down the giant hill before driving onto the “Island.” Even at seven years old he knew that the Island was called Battle Island because it involved a war between Indians long before he was born. He could never imagine, however, the generations of Indian History witnessed right there on Big Sandy Lake.

Every part of every trip held something new for him and at the same time after each trip he felt more and more comfortable and understood things only experience taught. All this experience, little doubt, gave him surprising insight into the world. No, he didn’t know where he came from and he didn’t care about the future. What he did know was that he found himself in the middle of a great adventure and so much of it revolved around the cabin at the lake. Going there, like today, was part of that adventure and it was for a time of planning.

Something deep inside told him that he was at a magical age. The sounds, sights, and tastes of life surrounded his every moment. Whether he was standing in his driveway at home near a town called Osseo looking across the endless expanse of potato fields with the morning sun warming his face, or here heading to the lake, he loved living. He would tell you so with his eyes.

He was getting sleepy here in the back seat with the lulling sound of the engine and minor rocking of the wagon. Soon he would be on the gravel and then the big hill going onto the Island. He would get up early tomorrow and run down to the lake. Then he would run over to the Island Cove Resort and see the old man that sold minnows – not to buy any – just to look at them. He had a quarter from his allowance and would use that for a box of Snaps. Sometimes he had to wait for the resort store to open because he always seemed to be there too early. He was comfortable as his eye’s closed in the darkness of the car.

Suddenly, He woke up – just as planned. The old wagon just “hit the gravel” and he heard it. In the darkness, he sat up. He placed his hands on the seat ahead and prepared himself for the hill somewhere soon.

The World lay in front of that windshield of the old station wagon and far beyond its headlights. Many a reader would bet that He would see that world in the years to come, and, when wounded, come back to the sanctuary of the Cabin and The Drive Up North. They would be right.


HELP WANTED: Seasonal Watercraft Inspectors – Posted April 1, 2017
If you are semi-retired, retired, or a college student, this is the perfect opportunity for you! Help protect the lakes with this fun summer employment. Apply on-line at ercstaffing.com or call Tyler at 218-824-9675.


AIS Spotted in Daggett Brook – Posted April 1, 2017 Submitted by Carrie Bell

This bull shark was recently spotted making its way down Daggett Brook! (April Fools!) Bull sharks generally grow to about 7.5 feet long and weigh up to 285 pounds. While bull sharks are commonly found along coastlines, bays, and harbors, they also frequent a most uncommon shark habitat—freshwater rivers. Bull sharks have traveled up the Mississippi River as far north as Illinois. Though the predators may come in close proximity to humans, statistics suggest that swimmers, surfers, and divers have little to fear from bull sharks. The United States averages just 16 shark attacks each year and slightly fewer than one shark-attack fatality every two years. Meanwhile, lightning kills more than 41 people each year in the coastal U.S. states alone.


DNR Firewise Program Helps Reduce Fire Risks – Posted April 1, 2017
By Dan Carroll, DNR northwest region Firewise specialist, Park Rapids, MN

Seven out of 10 structures destroyed by wildfire are ignited by the embers that land on the property and start small fires that find a suitable fuel bed (woodpile under deck, pine needles in gutters, tall grass in yard) that ignites a portion of a home or cabin.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ Firewise program provides tips to rural homeowners to reduce the risks of wildfires to their homes and cabins. Property owners who reduce the likelihood that an ember finds a suitable fuel bed, can significantly reduce the likelihood that their home or cabin will ignite.

The Firewise program identifies four factors homeowners can control that affect whether a home will survive a wildfire – access, site, structure and burning practices.

Access
Access affects how easily firefighters and emergency vehicles can find and access a home. Without good access and escape routes, firefighters will not endanger themselves to save a home.

Defensible zone
Creating a 100-foot “defensible zone” around your home or cabin, especially the 30 feet surrounding it, is critical to its chance of surviving a wildfire.

Anything flammable, including firewood piles and accumulated leaf and needle fall around foundations and decks should be removed.

Firewood or other combustible materials should not be stored in the zone. Decks within 5 feet of the ground should be enclosed with metal screening or sheeting. The area under decks, unless completely enclosed with metal screening, should not be used for storage.

A 10-foot minimum space should be maintained between evergreen tree crowns, and the tree crowns and home. This prevents fire from jumping tree to tree and tree to home.

Grass, leaves and branches provide a ladder for fuel to climb from ground to tree crown. These fuels can be eliminated by mowing tall grass, trimming shrubs and pruning the lower tree branches up 6 to 10 feet, or one-third of the tree height. Lawns should be kept green and mowed short to prevent fire from carrying to other areas.

Reducing fuels in the wooded area within the 100-foot zone and beyond will reduce the intensity of an approaching wildfire. Trees should be thinned/removed to increase their spacing, underbrush reduced and remaining trees pruned up 6 to 10 feet or one-third of the tree height. This will reduce the fuels and lessen the wildfire intensity.

Structure
Home modifications that further reduce wildfire risk include re-siding with brick, stone, stucco or steel, replacing shake roofing with class A shingles or steel, and enclosing foundations, decks and overhangs with steel, masonry or less expensive flame-resistant sheeting.

Burning Practices
The number one cause of wildfires in Minnesota is escaped debris burning fires. If you burn leaves and debris, consider alternatives like composting. Recreational fires should be located in a fire-safe pit or container and completely extinguished before left unattended.

For more information, visit mndnr.gov/firewise.


FLPOA Looks Ahead to 2017 – Posted January 1, 2017 – Submitted by Bob Stancer

We accomplished so much in 2016, and we are ready to focus on the great projects and programs we have slated for 2017! Some of the plans include:

  • Use all 800 hours of boat inspection hours as allocated by Crow Wing County.
  • Apply for IUP for AIS signs with property owners from previous years (interchange the two Burma Shave messages)
  • Continue the water testing with WAPOA and MPCA.
  • Continue with the WAPOA Professional Lake Mgt. (PLM) aquatic plant inspection at each of the 4 public boat launches. (We may be able to do this with FLPOA members that have been trained as AIS Detectors by the University of Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.)
  • Have a late spring membership drive to get all memberships paid and attract new members.
  • Participate in Zebra Mussel Veliger Testing
  • Follow and inform members of the Embridge line 3 pipeline proposal. (Currently planned to follow the original Sandpiper route.)
  • Assist in organizing volunteers to continue the removal of Purple Loosestrife from Mitchell Lake.
  • Increase awareness of DNR fisheries activity in our lakes.
  • Increase awareness of Crow Wing Forestry management and timber harvesting activity.

Thanks to your donations and dues, we continue to work on all these important tasks. We are grateful to have you as members of FLPOA, and we are excited about the things we can accomplish together in 2017.


The Life of a Watercraft Inspector – Posted January 1, 2017 – Submitted by Mike Prouty

The Fifty Lake area has four public boat landings: on Mitchell, Eagle, Fox, and Kego Lakes.  If you use these lakes during the boating season, you’re likely to meet a watercraft inspector on the boat ramp.

I wondered what it was like to be a watercraft inspector, and sit on a boat ramp for 10 hours a day, so I spoke with watercraft inspector Dale Hahn.  I met Dale on the Eagle Lake ramp last summer.  A big man, with a wrestler’s body and as deep a voice as I’ve ever heard, Dale has an impressive presence.  His dog Paisley, (a Wheaton terrier/poodle mix) keeps him company on the ramp, and has learned to stay in her cage as soon as she sees a car coming.  “Paisley loves spending the day with me on a ramp, and I think she misses it in the off season!” said Dale.

Dale is a retired project manager from Willmar Electric who oversaw huge electrical installations around the United States.  He enjoys fishing in his retirement, but most importantly he likes taking an active approach to helping keep the lakes in Fifty Lakes area clean.  “I saw a need to help people understand how they can protect the lakes we all enjoy,” said Dale.  “I love being a watercraft inspector.  I have a passion for my job, and I like to think I’m making a difference.  I’ve been doing this since the program began and it’s very rewarding to begin to see a different attitude on the part of the public.”

Dale is a people-person.  “My daughters will tell you that I love talking to people,” said Dale.  “And almost all my contacts on the boat ramp are very positive.  I feel especially gratified when I see fathers teaching their kids how to make sure the boat and trailer are clean, by disposing of weeds, cleaning the boat and trailer, and correctly disposing of live bait and trash.  Of course there are always those few who aren’t happy, but hopefully over time they’ll come around too.”

Dale, who has both level 1 and level 2 training, sees two major challenges to stopping the spread of aquatic invasive species: boat live wells containing water from possibly infested lakes and standing water in the bottom of watercraft. “When I started, there was some push back from fisherman about not being able to enter a lake with livewell water from another lake,” said Dale.  “But I think the message is slowing sinking in, that keeping water that potentially contains aquatic invasive species out of our lakes is important.”  Dale goes the extra mile, and brings several five gallon buckets full of clean water.  Giving a first-time angler who is not familiar with the problem an option of switching out his dirty water with clean water earns some goodwill.  “I think the best long term solution to the problem of livewell water is aerated bait buckets,” said Dale.  (After talking with Dale, I now own an aerated minnow bucket!)  Jet skis are also a potential source of spreading invasive species.  “Many jet ski owners are reluctant to start up their skis on the boat landing because they think it will harm their motors,” said Dale.  But it really doesn’t and we need them to purge the water inside their jet skis.”

Inspectors like Dale Hahn are on the front line in the struggle to limit the spread of aquatic invasive species.  The Fifty Lakes Property Owners Association, working with Crow Wing County and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, supports the Watercraft Inspector program.  The program will continue on the four public boat landings again next year.


Water Clarity – Posted January 1, 2017 – Submitted by Ken Neihart

How did the 2016 secchi disk readings compare to the reading from years gone by? Take a look at the table to see where your lake falls. Many volunteers collected the secchi disk readings from the lakes over the past 30 or so years. The volunteers are part of the Whitefish Property Owners Associations (WAPOA) Water Quality Program and/or the MPCA Citizen’s Monitoring Program. If anyone is interested in helping with the water testing, please contact a FLPOA Board member.


Stories From the North Woods – Posted January 1, 2017 – Submitted by Bill Leadens

Note: The Whiskey Jack is an original short story written for the novelty and pleasure of the Fifty Lakes Property Association Members and others.  We invite any and all of our neighbors and citizens  to feel free to explore simple thoughts and personal experiences and share with everyone.  Our common links to a common time and place give us all a reason to celebrate.  This small addendum  is a reoccurring space to share any memory or story relating to Minnesota and our great North Country.  Please share your thoughts and stories by clicking here

The bed sat about 18 inches from the inside wall of the old cabin.  He always made his bed and he needed the space to walk…. except this morning.

There was one bedroom in the log cabin.  The rest of the cabin was open.  On the far side, arranged furniture defined the living room with two windows forming the corner.  A visitor could see the lake 50 feet away from the east most facing of these two windows.  The window above the kitchen table did open but differently from some of the others.  That window was hinged on top and a stick was used to hold it open about 10 inches.  The old man could keep it open in the rain.  He liked that.   The table was covered with a red and white checkered vinyl like cloth so a good housekeeper could easily wipe crumbs clean.  The old man loved Limburger Cheese (no doubt from the German side of the family) on toast with coffee in the morning…..   only not this morning.  The smaller windows above the kitchen counter opened like the larger kitchen window – hinged on top.  The hand pump on the counter had to be primed so a pitcher of water always rested at the end of the counter.  A red 55 gallon fuel oil drum outside had a gravity feed line to the heater which was centered along the inside of the north wall.   A six foot wire hung in an arc but mostly parallel to the heater four feet below.

The old man in the bed didn’t take up much space and there would have been room next to him in that quilt covered double if need be.  The old mattress would show an indentation if he stood up.   His dog had a similar but smaller indentation in its rug lined bed on the bedroom floor.   The old man thought of Skippy a lot over the last 50 some years.   But, of course, Skippy and Skippy’s bed had been gone for a very long time.

Anyway, he wasn’t thinking of Skipper right now.  He was thinking about something on his bedroom window sill.  “What is that,?”  he thought.   He didn’t even have to lift his head off the pillow as he answered himself without moving his lips,  “Oh, its you.”

The  double hung window was open.  The lead counter weights inside the window frame itself had long ago broken away from the cordage but the window still would stay open by itself.  The window screen  kept the bird from flying right into the bedroom.  “That’s too bad,” the old man thought.

Except for a familiar feeling that some call loneliness , he had no pain.  The lake breeze blew in across his covered body.  “The feeling one gets from a lake breeze,” the old man would say to any that listened, “is like no other breeze in the world…. especially if it carries the cry of a Loon.”

The Whiskey Jack had been on that window sill before.  The old man had seen him many times over a lifetime.  His lifetime.   “My lifetime,” he thought.   Different today somehow.   ….”Whiskey Jack”…”what a neat name for a bird,” he thought.  He had heard somewhere that the Cree Indians thought the bird to be a “benign spirit.”  A “fun-loving” and “Cheerful bird”   maybe even given to “magic.”  The Cree called this little guy “Wihsakecahkw.”  This old man would have shaken his head on another day if he felt better because he knew so little about the Indian that lived along his lake shore long before the old cabin stood.   Of course, too,  he would have shaken his head about knowing so little about his Swedish Great Grandmother from Sweden lifetimes ago.  As a young women, he knew she came to Minnesota on a Steamer working in housekeeping to pay her way.   He did know that most Finlanders spoke the Swedish language.   At least he thought he knew that but it never made much sense to him as to why that would be.

The old man would have shaken his head many times before today.  “It is such a shame that  so much history was never written,” he would say.  “So much history only pasted from person to person”.   “One broken link in every chain ended every story.”  With opened eyes, the old man changed the subject and looked hard at the Whiskey Jack.

“How are you today, little guy?”  the old man moved his lips for the question with a small voice only the Whiskey Jack heard.  “I have never heard a bird speak,” he thought, “but that has never stopped me from talking to one.”   As a small boy, the old mans’ mother took him to the doctor and asked why her young son didn’t talk.   The doctor told her that her son,  “would speak when he is ready.”  The old man smiled as he laid quietly under the beige and red quilt remembering that story from his mother.   The doctor was right, the old man had talked plenty over the years.   “That was a long time ago”  he remembered.  “Maybe that is the way it is with the Whiskey Jack”, he thought.  “ I would like to ask the doctor about the Whiskey Jack and not speaking,” he thought again.   But, no one had seen the doctor for a very long time.    The old man shook is head one time slightly,  but an observer would have noticed.

The old man hoped that if he had company right now …maybe that Cree Indian that lost the old flint spear head his neighbor just found in a pile of dirt or maybe his Great Grandmother who could speak of family in another time and place .   If they did drop by,  he hoped they would wait for him to answer the door before moving on.   “Yes,”  he would answer the door if he heard a knock.    “Please let me know if you see someone coming up the lane,”  he whispered to the Whiskey Jack.    It would give him more time to get ready,  he thought.

“Where did everyone go?”, asked the old man to his friend on the sill.  To the old man it seemed like just a minute ago the cabin was full of people…….or maybe it was more than a minute.   “I don’t know,” said the Whiskey Jack.    The old man knew the Whiskey Jack “really did know”  where everyone went but for some reason refused to say.   The old man laid still and wondered why the Whiskey Jack didn’t tell him the truth.

Some time went by in the cabin on this mild summer day but, still the Whiskey Jack sat there on the window ledge.   “Its getting dark, what are you still doing here?” mumbled the old man but he wasn’t sure he was heard.   “You told me to keep an eye on your lane”,  “Oh, ……so I did,” he said, …”how long will you keep watch?”
“Not long now, ” said the Whiskey Jack,  “there is someone walking up your lane now.”

The old man closed his eyes was suddenly too busy to thank the Whiskey Jack or even smile.  He had to get ready and answer the door.

Somewhere in the north woods of Minnesota on a mild summer day, an old man readied himself without a stir.   A Grey Jay -also known as a Whiskey Jack- flew from the window sill of an old log cabin located about 50 feet from the most beautiful lake you ever saw.   In the breeze floated the distant cry of a common Loon.   An old man used to live there.

WIKIPEDIA
Wisakedjak (Wìsakedjàk in Algonquin, Wīhsakecāhkw in Cree and Wiisagejaak in Oji-cree) is the Crane Manitou found in northern Algonquian and Dene storytelling, similar to the trickster god Nanabozho in Ojibwa aadizookaanan (sacred stories) and Inktonme in Assiniboine myth. He is generally portrayed as being responsible for a great flood which destroyed the world originally made by the Creator, as well as the one who created the current world with magic, either on his own or with powers given to him by the Creator for that specific purpose. His name is subject to many variant forms, including Weesack-kachack, Wisagatcak, Wis-kay-tchach, Wissaketchak, Woesack-ootchacht, Vasaagihdzak, Weesageechak, and undoubtedly others. The Cree people believe the wīhsakecāhkw is a benign spirit, fun-loving and cheerful.[1] The bird is seen in Cree stories as an example of good manners and good company.[2] It was sometimes Anglicized as whiskey jack, which became an alternate name for the gray jay.


Purple Loosestrife Spotted on Mitchell Lake – Posted October 31, 2016

On August 31st, Jeanne Mevissen alerted the FLPOA to a possible sighting of Purple Loosestrife on Mitchell Lake. The sighting was confirmed, and in September, several Mitchell Lake property owners gathered together to begin removal of the seeds, flowers and plants. Thanks to Jeanne and the Mitchell Lake property owners for taking action, and to Ken Neihart for his speedy work to confirm the Purple Loosestrife.

Purple Loosestrife invades marshes and lakeshores, replacing cattails and other wetland plants. The plant can form dense, impenetrable stands, which are unsuitable as cover, food, or nesting sites for a wide range of native wetland animals including ducks, geese, rails, bitterns, muskrats, frogs, toads, and turtles. Many rare and endangered wetland plants and animals are also at risk. Click here to learn more about Purple Loosestrife, and click here to view a short training module on how to identify Purple Loosestrife.


Stories From the North Woods – Posted October 31, 2016

We all have a favorite story about a treasured time spent at the cabin or on the lake. And, as the cooler, darker days of Autumn arrive, it seems the perfect time to write about these memories. If you would like share a short story or poem about your experiences, we would like to hear from you! Please email your story or poem to flpoamn@gmail.com. We’ll post it on the web site, and send it out in the next FLPOA email update.


Cross Lake Zebra Mussels – Posted October 31, 2016

Below are a couple photos, submitted by Bob Stancer, of the log landing lifts taken out of Cross Lake around October 20th. Note the large number of zebra mussels.

crosslakeloglandinglifts100216

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


FLPOA Board Meeting Minutes – Posted October 31, 2016

View the FLPOA Board Meeting Minutes by clicking on the link below.

FLPOA Board Meeting Minutes – October 8, 2016


FLPOA Board Meeting – Posted October 5, 2016

Please join us for an FLPOA Board Meeting on Saturday, October 8th, at 8:30am. The meeting will be held in the Fifty Lakes Community Center located at the Fire Station. Please see the agenda below, and everyone is welcome!

FLPOA Board Meeting Agenda – October 8, 2016


FLPOA ALERT No Wake Request  Posted on July 15, 2016

Sheriff Todd Dahl is asking for the public’s help and cooperation when venturing out on our area lakes.

Due to the recent heavy rain, our lakes and rivers are again at very high levels. Reports of docks under water and shore erosion have been reported to the sheriff’s office. Extensive wave action in these areas can cause a great deal of damage.

Please use caution when boating and be mindful of the boat waves washing into shore. A special request to Wake Boats to operate far from shores when pulling wake boarders. We also ask that you share this information with your family, visitors, friends and neighbors to help protect our shorelines from erosion.

Thanks for your continued care of the lakes and land that we love!


FLPOA Meeting Minutes  Posted on July 12, 2016

Please click on the link below to view the June 25, 2016 FLPOA Meeting Minutes.                   FLPOA Meeting Minutes June 25, 2016


Renew Your Dues  Posted on June 29, 2016

If you have not yet paid your 2016 membership dues of $20 please do so. (As of June 25, 2016, we only had 36 paid members.) We need your financial support to continue water quality testing, public launch boat inspections, lake plant surveys, invasive plant screening, zebra mussel veliger testing, and other programs. We also have recurring expenses such as insurance, memberships, and contributions to other groups such as Crow Wing County Lakes and Rivers Advocates, Friends of the Head Waters, White Fish Property Owners WAPOA, Lakes and Rivers Alliance,  Conservation Minnesota, and web site hosting. (If you pay using PayPal please consider paying $21 to cover the PayPal transaction cost of $.80.)

Click Here to Become a FLPOA Member or to Renew Your Dues.


FLPOA Annual Meeting – Posted June 29, 2016

The annual meeting will be held on Saturday, August 20, 2016, at the Foundation Building, and everyone is welcome. We will gather at 8:30am for coffee and treats and will start the board meeting at 9:00am. We plan to have a guest speaker between 10:00am and 10:30am with meeting adjourned by 11:30am. Please mark your calendar and try to attend this meeting. Last year our paid membership was at 175, and we had about 20 people at the meeting. Additionally, the current board consists of 7 members, of which 5 members have terms that expire in 2016. The president has a term limit of 2 years. (See current board member list here.) Please consider becoming a board member.

We look forward to seeing you all in August, and thanks for your continued support!


FLPOA Meeting MinutesPosted June 29, 2016                                                                                 Click here to view the May 14, 2016 Meeting Minutes


Enbridge Pipeline UpdatePosted December 21, 2015
Enbridge required to provide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandpiper Pipeline

The Minnesota Supreme Court has denied the Enbridge/PUC petitions for further review of the September Court of Appeals decision. This means that the Supreme Court refused to hear the case.

The unanimous September 15th, Court of Appeals ruling in favor of FOH/MCEA contentions will stand: A comprehensive Environmental Impact Statement is necessary before proceeding with the pipeline approval process. This means that the plans for the Sandpiper pipeline cannot move forward until the Environmental Impact Statement is completed.

Thanks for everyone’s support in our ongoing effort to protect our land and lakes!

FLPOA Meeting MinutesPosted December 21, 2015
Click here to view the meeting minutes.


Friends of the HeadwatersPosted September 21, 2015
Creating some “northern Light” on the Enbridge pipeline proposals                                                         By Melodee Monicken, for Friends of the Headwaters 

What’s happening with Friends of the Headwaters?  Well, as most of you know, Friends of the Headwaters is a small, northern MN environmental group, a scrappy David taking on the daunting Canadian Goliath, Enbridge.  So last winter Friends of the Headwaters (FOH) and the MN Center for Environmental Advocacy (MCEA) initiated an appeal regarding the necessity for an Environmental Impact Statement (an EIS) on the Enbridge Sandpiper. Yesterday, the MN Court of Appeals ruled that the PUC must provide an EIS before granting a Certificate of Need to Enbridge.

In Monday’s unanimous decision, the Court concluded that “MEPA requires an environmental impact statement to be completed before a final decision is made to grant or deny a certificate of need.” As the Minneapolis Star Tribune pointed out: “The Friends of the Headwaters argued that conducting certificate of need proceedings before completing an environmental impact statement violated the Minnesota Environmental Policy Act. The appeals court agreed.”

This is a big deal with important ramifications for MN law. And it’s a victory for FOH and the MCEA.  But nothing is “over.”  Friends of the Headwaters anticipates a strong response from Enbridge and their powerful allies. We will need your continued support going forward.

What can I do to help Friends of the Headwaters? This victory for Friends of the Headwaters/MCEA in the Court of Appeals will feel even better if our work on this case results in the comprehensive Environmental Impact Statement FOH has been requesting for the last two years.  Like you, Friends of the Headwaters believes that, if oil pipelines are needed, they should be located away from Minnesota’s most pristine water resources.   We will all need to be vigilant about not settling for an “environmental review” that fails to provide qualitative analysis and risk assessment.

You can also help us by sharing our updates, visiting our website, sharing our posts on social media, liking our Facebook page, attending our fundraisers, and donating money for FOH legal expenses.

Website: www.friendsoftheheadwaters.org

Donations: http://www.friendsoftheheadwaters.org/donate.html

Address: Friends of the Headwaters, P.O. Box 583, Park Rapids, MN 56470

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/savemississippiheadwaters

We hope you will write to the governor, legislators, and newspapers announcing your emphatic support for the Court of Appeals’ decision. (Addresses included below.)

And you can weigh in with your citizen objections to the proposed Enbridge route by September 30.  (This schedule might change. Because of the Court of Appeals’ ruling in favor of FOH, the schedule is unsettled. I’ll keep you posted.) Following are the addresses for the Governor, the Agency Commissioners, and the PUC:

Governor Mark Dayton, Office of the Governor & Lt Governor, 116 Veterans Service Building 20 W 12th Street, St. Paul, MN 55155 Email: Send your questions and comments to Governor Dayton and Lt. Governor Smith http://mn.gov/governor/contact-us/form/ Telephone: 651-201-3400 Toll Free: 800-657-3717

John Stine, Commissioner, MPCA • MPCA 520 Lafayette Road N St. Paul, MN 55155-4194 651-296-6300, 800-657-3864, TTY: 651-282-5332 Phone: 651-757-2014 Fax: 651-296-6334

Thomas J Landwehr, Commissioner, DNR  • Department of Natural Resources – 500 Lafayette Road St. Paul, MN 55155-4040 (651) 296-6157 (888) 646-6367 info.dnr@state.mn.us

If I donate money to Friends of the Headwaters, where does it go? If you donate money to Friends of the Headwaters, we can assure you that your support is funding legal strategies to protect Minnesota’s water resources. We have no paid staff, and we don’t tap donor support to participate in far-flung marches or energy seminars. Everything you donate to Friends of the Headwaters is used to finance legal and procedural initiatives around the Enbridge pipeline proposals.

Make Donations Here: http://www.friendsoftheheadwaters.org/donate.html

What’s next? FOH president Richard Smith’s reaction to Monday’s ruling:  “During the last two years, Friends of the Headwaters made the environmental argument, the science argument, the legal argument, and the economic argument. The PUC overlooked the merits of our case. So we are grateful that the Court heard us.”

Indeed, we are grateful to have been heard. But we also know that the Court of Appeals ruling opens up many complex procedural and legal opportunities. We’re just everyday people who believe that MN lake country and the Mississippi Headwaters deserve protection for future generations so we’ll be researching experts, talking to other opposition groups, creating maps and graphics, raising funds, gathering data to buttress our arguments, and consulting with legal/procedural strategists.

Thank you for your energy, time, talent, resources, and continued support.


A Win for the EnvironmentPosted September 17, 2015
The Sandpiper Certificate of Need has been invalidated by the Minnesota Court of Appeals

Last June, the Public Utilities Commission granted a Certificate of Need (CON) to Enbridge Energy. However, environmental organization, Friends of the Headwaters, appealed the Enbridge Sandpiper Pipeline CON to the Minnesota Court of Appeals, requesting an Environmental Impact Statement be completed before approving the Sandpiper CON.

On September 14th, The Minnesota Court of Appeals decision was to “reverse and remand for respondent Minnesota Public Utilities Commission to reconsider whether to issue a certificate of need after an environmental impact statement has been completed”.  In other words, the court found the Public Utilities Commission “erred” in giving the certificate to Enbridge due to the lack of a full Environmental Impact Statement. The official appeals court ruling can be read here.

This is a giant step toward the continued protection of the land and the lakes that we love!

For more information see the following links:

Star Tribune Stories
• http://www.startribune.com/groups-want-minnesota-regulators-to-reconsider-sandpiper-pipeline-route/322855291/
• http://www.startribune.com/court-says-regulators-need-environmental-review-of-sandpiper-pipeline-project/327541511/

MINNPOST Story
• http://www.minnpost.com/earth-journal/2015/09/why-sandpiper-pipeline-went-aground-appeals-court

Friends of the Headwaters
• http://friendsoftheheadwaters.org/latest-news-and-information.html


WAPOA to Host Pipeline Information Meeting on August 5th

You likely have heard of the Sandpiper Pipeline. Have you heard about Line 3, Line 67 and other proposed pipelines? Join Whitefish Area Property Owners Association (WAPOA) members and Friends of the Headwaters President, Richard Smith, at the Fifty Lakes Foundation Building on Wednesday, August 5th at 2:00pm to learn more.

Click to Learn More About this Event


Annual FLPOA Board Meeting Scheduled for August 8th

The Annual Fifty Lakes Property Owners Association (FLPOA) meeting is scheduled for Saturday, August 8, 2015, at 8:30am. The meeting will be held at the Fifty Lakes Foundation Building, and Jeff Forester, Chairman of Minnesota Lakes & Rivers Alliance, is speaking. Everyone is welcome!

Click to See Meeting Agenda


WAPOA Lakes Vegetation Assessment

An aquatic vegetation survey was conducted on Whitefish Lake and its respective bays including six off chain access sites on Monday July 6th 2015. In total, 29 access sites were surveyed utilizing visual observations and the use of a double edged rake when water clarity was inadequate. Each area was surveyed with a 100 x 100 area. Surveyors recorded all aquatic plants found in the stated area. A document with all field notes is also attached to this report. This report is designed to give a general overview of all areas that were surveyed and which aquatic species were found at each location. This survey did not result in the finding of any new Aquatic Invasive Species.

Lake Vegetation Survey – July 6, 2015


Mitchell Lake CLP Report

Curly Leaf Pondweed (CLP) was reported in Mitchell Lake in July, 2014. Attached, please find an Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) report for Mitchell Lake provided by the Minnesota DNR.

Mitchell Lake Curly Leaf Pondweed DNR Report May 2015

If you have comments or questions, please let us know by emailing flpoamn@gmail.com. We are always happy to hear from you!


Spring Edition of The Ripple

We hope you enjoy the spring edition of The Ripple. If you have story ideas, comments or general suggestions, please let us know by emailing flpoamn@gmail.com. We are always happy to hear from you!

TheRippleMay2015


Renew Your Dues – Online!

In an effort to make support and donations more accessible for members, FLPOA decided to make a change to the membership cycle. Memberships now run from June 1st to May 31st. This new timeline coincides much better with member availability. Any membership dues paid in 2015 will be good through May 31, 2016.  FLPOA is also excited to announce that members can now renew memberships or make donations online from the FLPOA web site.

Click Here to Become a FLPOA Member or to Renew Your Dues.


Crow Wing County Proposed AIS Plan for 2015

The mission of the Crow Wing County AIS Plan is to provide leadership in preventing the introduction and limiting the spread of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) in Crow Wing County by coordinating inspection, decontamination, targeted treatment, and education efforts. Learn more about this effort by reviewing the Crow Wing County AIS Plan Packet of information.

Click to View the Crow Wing County AIS Plan Packet.


Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) ALERT – Curly-Leaf Pondweed (CLP) Detected in Mitchell Lake

Please click on the links below to become familiar with CLP and to learn how to detect it. If you find evidence of CLP, contact a FLPOA Board Member by clicking here.  If CLP is found early, it can be stopped. Thank you for helping to protect our lakes!

Minnesota DNR Curly-Leaf Pondweed Information

Curly-Leaf Pondweed Fact Sheet

Curly-Leaf Pondweed Training Module


Oil Pipeline Proposed Under Daggett Creek

There is a very real threat to the environment in the Fifty Lakes Area, which requires your immediate attention, the proposed Sandpiper crude oil pipeline. Many of us, particularly those who are seasonal Fifty Lakes residents, may not even be aware of the proposed Sandpiper oil pipeline which would run under Daggett Creek, a mile or two north of Mitchell Lake. Learn More