Fall Newsletter

Upper Hay Lake Association P.O. Box 769 Pequot Lakes, Minnesota 56472 

Fall Newsletter October 2019                                               Page

Greetings from your President Claire Steen 

Larson from Hayland Woods in Onamia is our What a beautiful fall it has been! Although we have been slapped with an early snowfall, the colorful leaves have hung around longer than usual.  This time of the year always makes me a little sad to put the kayak and boat away. However, it reminds me  how fortunate we are to have a place on beautiful Upper Hay Lake.

Our UHLA has welcomed Brad Schultz as a new member.  Brad recently moved to Hay Lake Lodge and will be a year round resident on the lake.  He is replacing Craig Swandal’s position on the board.  We have one more seat available on the Upper Hay Lake Association Board and would like to have this filled by spring.

Recently I attended an Aquatic Invasive Species Good news! Again there were NO zebra mussel veligers found in Upper Hay. Realizing that these meeting at the Land Services Building. We were veligers move with water currents, and since there informed that we should be able to get the same hours of inspection in the summer of 2020. This summer Upper Hay Lake was granted 300 hours of inspection at the public landing. It would be helpful to our lake if we could get volunteers trained in the early spring so that we could have additional are no lakes feeding INTO Upper Hay, it stands to reason that the public access is the ONLY avenue for them to get into our lake. We have a trained and certified volunteer at the access every weekend all summer. Our inspector was still there mid September. Because the DNR (in it’s infinite wisdom) has a sign by the landing stating we have inspections, especially in the early evening shift. Are you interested in helping out with inspection? Your time would be greatly appreciated. 

Some items of interest:

  • The Porta Potty at the public landing was well received and will be continued for next year. 
  • The boat parade will be on July 4th at 3:30 PM. Please note the time change from 3:00 PM. This time change is to accommodate those who are attending festivities in Pequot Lakes. 
  • Because the annual picnic was poorly attended this summer, the UHLA Board has decided to 
  • The annual meeting will be held on Saturday, May 16, 2020 at the Jenkins VFW.  Shelly Larson from Hayland Woods in Onamia is our speaker.  Shelly has a wealth of information on native plants.  She will be working with Cindy Rieck on her shoreline after the meeting.

A friendly reminder – Upper Hay Lake Association will only be successful if we have a strong and interested membership. Thank you for your commitment. 

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Fall Is Here – Bruce Ohland  

1. 2019 Zebra Mussel veliger testing

Each year the Lake Association volunteers conduct a zebra mussel veliger survey. We did this on July 10th of this year.  RMB labs receive the samples we collect and do microscopic exams of these samples.  Good news!  Again there are NO zebra mussel veligers found on Upper Hay.  Realizing that these veligers move with water currents, and since there are no lakes feeding INTO Upper Hay, it stands to reason that the public access is the ONLY avenue for them to get into our lake.  We have a trained and certified volunteer at the access every weekend all summer.  Our inspector was still there mid September.  Because the DNR (in it’s infinite wisdom) has a sign by the landing stating we have Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) in the lake, the fact is (so far) we do not.  Let’s do everything we can to continue keeping UHL free of AIS.

Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) in the lake, the fact is (so far ) we do not. Let’s do everything we can to continue keeping UHL free of AIS. 

2. Food as medicine program Happy Dancing Turtle is seeking participants for a new grant-funded program, “Food As Medicine”, for 10 individuals/families. This year-long community supported agriculture (CSA) program is available to those seeking treatment or in recovery*. In exchange for the twice-monthly food boxes (seasonally available, local products – estimated value >$700) participants are required to complete pre and post surveys and attend nutrition/cooking classes. Call HDT for information and to join, 587- sponsor a social event at the Jenkins VFW 2303. This program is made possible with support during Burger Night on Thursday, August 6. Hope to see you there! 

Some items of interest: 

  • The Porta Potty at the public landing was well received and will be continued for next year. 
  • The boat parade will be on July 4th at 3:30 PM. Please note the time change from 3:00 PM. This time change is to accommodate those who are attending festivities in Pequot Lakes. 
  • Because the annual picnic was poorly attended this summer, the UHLA Board has decided to sponsor a social event at the Jenkins VFW Burger Night on Thursday, August 6.  Hope to see you there!
  • The annual meeting will be held on Saturday, May 16, 2020 at the Jenkins VFW.  Shelley 

from Northwest Area Foundation and Region 5 Development Commission. Please pass this information on, program will begin soon. *Participant information kept confidential. 

Environmental Stewardship Today, for Tomorrow 

Fall Newsletter October 2019 Page

  1. Grant Money for Forest Plans and Land Management Activities Do you want to know more about your woodlands? Do you want to manage your property for wildlife? Are you interested in lower tax rates, conserving your land for the future, or improving soil and water quality on your property? If you answered “yes” to any of those questions, have 20+ acres of contiguous property and are interested in learning more about funding possibilities, contact the Crow Wing Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD). Have a Minnesota certified plan writer walk your property with you and help you improve your land! Funding deadlines are coming up and funding is limited, so contact the Crow Wing SWCD today! For more information contact Clayton Lenk, District Forester, Email: clayton.lenk@crowwingswcd.org or by phone at 218-828-6197 Funding is provided by the Environmental and Natural Resources Trust Fund (ENRTF) 
  2. Hummingbird Migration From the Hummingbird Guide Hummingbird migration is the flight to and from their winter homes in Mexico and Central America in order to take advantage of the available food sources for their survival. The Ruby-throated hummingbird will leave Mexico and Central America, where they are concentrated and there is stiff competition for food, to North America where there is less competition as they spread out to spend the summer in their breeding grounds. They have the capability to fly over 2000 kilometers (1243 miles) non-stop. The spring migration for the Ruby-throated hummingbird usually starts in February and ends in late May in their northern most habitat of Canada. It is believed that hummingbirds will return year after year to the same feeders where they wore born. Some scientists believe that they will also stop at the same feeders along their route on the same day every year during their migration journey. Males will usually migrate first followed by the females about 10 to 14 days later. They will double their body mass in weight to “fuel-up” for the long journey. 

The fall migration south back to Mexico and Central America starts when the abundance of insects (their main food source) starts to dwindle with cold temps. This usually starts in late August into September. However, not all hummingbirds migrate each year. Some will spend the winter along the western coast of North America. 

How fast does a hummingbird fly? The distance a hummingbird flies in one day is determined by the species, terrain, wind velocity, and food sources along the way. The average hummingbird flies 25 miles per hour. A Ruby- throated hummingbird flies across the Gulf of Mexico none-stop using the wind to their advantage, increasing their speed and shortening the time it takes to cross over the water. Hummingbird banders have shown that this journey across the Gulf generally takes about 20 hours. So just think about it. This tiny bird flies non-stop for 20 hours across the water. How can they accomplish this incredible feat when we consider their food requirements? After all, can’t a hummingbird starve without food within several hours? The answer lies in anatomy. A hummingbird bulks up for weeks before migration. Here is another reason to keep those feeders up for a couple weeks beyond the very last hummingbird visit. Hummingbirds can store up to half their total body weight as fat for the purpose of migration. I had wondered if they fly throughout the night. The answer is yes, hummingbirds fly throughout the night when making the trip across the Gulf. From birdwatching.com When should you take in your feeders? You can leave your hummingbird feeders up as long as hummingbirds are visiting them. And then a week or so longer, just in case a straggler comes through. You need not be afraid of causing the birds to delay their migration and get caught by winter. That isn’t going to happen. It’s not the lack of food that tells a hummingbird when to go south. It’s the bird’s internal biological calendar, or circannual rhythms. As the time of migration approaches, the hummingbird starts to pack on fat, which will fuel 

Fall Newsletter October 2019 Page

its journey. And then it gets an overwhelming urge to migrate. The biological rhythms run automatically, but they are synchronized and fine tuned by the changing day length. The amount of food in the environment does not affect the migratory urge. In fact, the birds leave their summer home while food is still plentiful. That way, they are reasonably assured of finding more food along the way. So your hummingbird feeder is not going to tempt the hummers to overstay their schedule. In fact, the sugar water you offer will help the hummingbirds “gas up” for their journey. Hummingbirds that are already on their way south can stop by and replenish their stores, too. 

  1. CROW WING COUNTY OFFERS SEPTIC SYSTEM UPGRADE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Crow Wing County has received $32,746 in grant fund from Minnesota Board of Water & Soil Resources to provide funding to replace or protect septic systems for residents. Proper septic maintenance ensures that we are protecting our groundwater from human contaminants. In 2018, $10,125 in loans were disbursed to Crow Wing County Residents. Funding for residents will be processed through Region Five Development Commission. Residents who receive funding will be provided a loan from the Region Five Development Commission at 3% for 60 months for the cost of the project. The terms of the loan are set by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. The total funds awarded to an applicant will depend on the cost of the system, yearly income, and size of household. Loans can be paid off at any time, with no pre-payment penalty. A $50 application fee to cover the cost of a credit report, is required at time of application. Priority of funding will first be given to low and very low-income land owners. All need based low-income applicants will be funded to some degree, pending repayment availability as determined by the North Central Economic Development Association Loan Board. Applications are available at: http://northcentraleda.org/homeowner/. If you are interested in learning more about the program contact Region Five Development Commission – Stephanie Barney at (218)296-5201. The Land 

Services Department is committed to providing excellent customer service while helping our residents make wise decisions that protect Crow Wing County’s extraordinary natural resources. Citizens are encouraged to contact the Land Services Office at (218) 8241010 or to visit the Crow Wing County Web Site www.crowwing.us for more information From Nicole Erickson, CWC Land Services Department Office: (218) 824-1010 Direct: (218) 824-1142 www.crowwing.us 

The Humming birds have departed for warmer climates. We are covering our plants on those cold nights. We’ve had our first freeze. Now we wait for that much anticipated “Indian summer”. Fall is a refreshing, great sleeping weather season. For a few weeks the colors are amazing. It is time to get outside and enjoy it. Remember to wear some blaze orange when out walking during deer season, Nov 3-18! 

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News from the Minn. Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center – Whitey Larson Announcing Nine New Research Projects: 1. Developing carp removal schemes using social learning behaviors: This project will develop a new way to effectively remove invasive commodities carp from Minn. lakes by selectively attracting them with food and removing them with specialized nets, while also taking into account their social behaviors. 2. Historical analyses of spiny waterflea invasion 

patterns: Now that research has indicated that spiny waterflea have been in some MN lakes much longer than original thought, this project will set key hypotheses about the relationships between spiny waterflea invasion and the response to ecological, economical, and recreational services provided by MN lakes. 3. AIS impacts on walleye populations and 

mercury concentrations: This project will assess the impacts of zebra mussels on walleye in MN lakes, and will identify lakes that are most vulnerable to negative impacts based on recruitment, food web dynamics, and mercury concentrations. 4. Field validation of multi beam sonar zebra 

mussel detection: This project will include field validation of lab results that test the utility of a 

Fall Newsletter October 2019 Page

swath mapping system (multi beam sonar) for detecting and quantifying the presence and abundance of zebra mussels at large scales. 5. Impacts of invader removal on native 

vegetations recovery: This project will evaluate the ability of invasive aquatic plant control efforts to lead to recovery of native aquatic plant communities. 6. Genetics to improve hybrid and Eurasian 

watermilfoil management: This project will identify potentially problematic genotypes of hybrid watermilfoil and begin to test these genotypes for herbicidal response. 7. Evaluating innovative coatings to suppress 

priority AIS: This project will test and develop a new coating that can be applied to equipment surfaces in order to decrease the spread of zebra mussels. 8. Will property values cool as AIS heats up? This project will evaluate the economic impacts of Eurasian watermilfoil on property values as well as quantify the role of water temperature and other lake characteristics in deterring Eurasian watermilfoil abundance. 9. Evaluation of koi herpesvirus for use as a 

potential biocontrol agent for common carp in Minnesota: After detecting koi herpesvirus in numerous mass mortalities of carp with no apparent effect on native species, this project will now evaluate its potential and efficacy as a biocontrol agent. 

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Treasurer’s Report – Ken Meyer As of October 15, 2019 we have 97 paid members for 2019 giving us a dues income of $2,315.00. The extra donations, year to date, are $1,689.94 plus an additional $800 from Thrivent Financial and Kris Jensen. In addition, we have two members paid up for 2020, plus $75 in extra donations. 

We currently have $10,302.97 in Savings and $4,434.54 in Checking, plus a $25,000 CD. This gives us a total of $39,737.51. I know this may seem like a large sum of money, however, it wouldn’t go far if we have an AIS invasion. 

Aquatic Vegetation Permits On October 1st the DNR email all members that received an Aquatic Vegetation Permit this year. Each permit 

holder is required to complete a survey by December 31st

If you conducted the permitted work follow the instructions below to log into MPARS and complete your survey. 

If you already have a MPARS account: * Log into MPARS at https://webapps11.dnr.state.mn.us/mpars/public/permits * Click on the APM/IAPM Annual Survey link in the box at the top, right of your screen to begin the survey. 

If you are using MPARS for the first time: * You will need to create an account and link to your existing permit(s). * Go to: http://www.mndnr.gov/mpars/index.html and select the Open MPARS button. * After you have created your account and linked your permit(s) you will receive an email confirmation. * Once you receive email confirmation that you have been linked to your permit, log in to your account. * Click on the APM/IAPM Annual Survey link in the box at the top, right of your screen to begin reporting. 

If you have any questions or need a paper survey form, please contact: mparsapm.dnr@state.mn.us. Support is available during normal office hours.” 

Remember, you will have to apply for your own permit from the DNR in the future; NOT through the lake association. You NEED to get used to working with them and their requirements. 

If you contact the DNR as listed above and still have questions or problems, contact me at kenmeyer@tds.net and I will do my best to help you. 

Thank you! And have a Happy & Safe Halloween!